Study to examine sexual assault in villages

January 2015

Jeremy Braithwaite, a Ph.D. candidate in Criminology, Law and Society, will be interviewing victims of sexual assault in Dillingham, Alaska, as part of a statewide project studying the disproportionate number of sex crimes in rural Alaska. Safe and Fear-Free Environment, Inc. (SAFE) in Dillingham will host Braithwaite. He is interested in learning about the lives and experiences of the victims, especially regarding the victim's identity, sense of belonging in the community and their family life. Braithwaite received an honorable mention award from the Public Impact Fellowship and is using this to fund part of research.

Learn More:

 

Cheers!

January 2015

This year's 50th anniversary Homecoming festival will feature a special Anteater Ale created by Brandon Fender, Social Ecology '08 alumnus. Fender is a senior analyst with RSG, a community development consulting firm in Santa Ana but also has a passion for craft brewing and started The Good Beer Company last year. The Good Beer Company is located in downtown Santa Ana in a 130-year-old brick and wood former livery stable next to the Ronald Reagan Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse. “I wanted to open an interesting place where people want to be,” Fender says. “Beer, community and a beautiful building – this is the embodiment of my passions.” These passions, he adds, were nurtured at UCI, especially in the School of Social Ecology, which provided him the support and training that led him to RSG, which works with local governments and private entities to build better communities.

Read Article

Photo credit: Steve Zylius/ UCI


 

5 different views of LAPD community policing

January 2015

Paul Jesilow, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, was interviewed by Frank Stoltze from radio station 89.3 KPCC. Stoltze interviewed 5 different groups to see what their views were on LAPD community policing efforts. Jesilow, the professor in the interview, studies community policing and traces many of today's problems to the 1950's when a "bureaucratic style" of policing took hold in the United States. “Police departments began to see themselves as the crime expert and the citizens were merely to call the police and to request assistance,” states Jesilow. “As a result, police officers’ have a tendency to ignore what the community has to say about policing.”

Read More

 

Violent crime rose 14.3% in L.A.; officials vow action

January 2015

George Tita, Profsssor of Criminology, Law and Society, was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article regarding violent crime and it's 14.3% rise in Los Angeles last year, compared with 2013. Chief Charlie Beck attributed the increase of serious assaults to three factors: improvements in how LAPD classified assault crimes, an increase in domestic violence cases and alcohol-fueled street attacks. Errors were found in the way that crimes were classified-aggravated assaults were recorded as minor incidents.Changes have been made in the way that the crimes are classified but judging the LAPD's violent crime trends over time is difficult because past years probably contain large numbers of errors, said Tita.' We don't have as accurate a picture as we certainly would all love to have. But this is where we start counting crime again, and as long as everybody adheres to the process LAPD adopted in 2014, we will be good to go," states Tita.

Learn More:

Naps may boost your baby's memory

January 2015

Angela Lukowski, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, was quoted in a U.S. News and World Report article about how naps may help babies process and preserve memories. "The lesson for parents seems to be that napping after learning may help infants remember information over time," Lukowski said. She added that naps of at least 30 minutes seem to be helpful, although there hasn't been much, if any, research into shorter naps.

Learn More:

 

 

Lowerson Bredow and Geislar receive Global Food Initiative fellowships

January 2015

Victoria Lowerson Bredow and Sally Geislar, Planning, Policy, and Design Ph.D. students have been awarded $2,500 fellowships each to fund research and related projects that focus on food issues.The fellowships are part of UC President Janet Napolitano's Global Food Initiative Student Fellowship Program. Lowerson-Bredow is exploring how to build a more sustainable food system in Orange County and Geislar will look to preserve and increase the synergy between the UCI community and the farmers market at University Center.

Read More

Online master’s program in criminology ranked No. 1

January 2015

The Master of Advanced Study (MAS) degree in Criminology, Law and Society has been named the top online graduate criminal justice program in the country by U.S News and World Report. The MAS degree program was created in 2002 and it was the first online degree program in the University of California system. George Tita, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, and Teresa Dalton, Lecturer, co-direct the program. Currently, 120 people with backgrounds in criminal justice, law and social services are enrolled. Since the program began, 256 students have earned MAS degrees, with another 65 set to graduate in June.

Read More

 

Emotion, Authority, and Death: (Raced) Negotiations in Mock Capital Jury Deliberations

December 2014

Mona Lynch, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, and her colleague, Greg Haney, a Professor of Psychology from UC Santa Cruz, recently completed a study, Emotion, Authority, and Death: (Raced) Negotiations in Mock Capital Jury Deliberations, that was published in the Journal of the American Bar Foundation.The study, published this month in the Journal of the American Bar Foundation, indicates that emotion plays a central role in death penalty deliberations. It also draws three main conclusions:

The power of the middle class

December 2014

Richard Matthew, Professor of Planning, Policy, and Design and Director of the Center for Unconventional Security Affairs (CUSA), spoke at TEDxUC Irvine's event, the Adventure of Discovery. The event aimed to discuss the redefinition of the word “adventure” in application rather than meaning and ultimately help break the eat, work, sleep cycle. Matthew talked about the untapped potential of the middle class.

View Video

Chen named Chancellor's Professor

December 2014

Chuansheng Chen, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, has been named a UCI Chancellor's Professor. This title recognizes Chen as an exceptional scholar who has demonstrated unusual academic merit and has high promise for continued achievement. Chen is a developmental psychologist interested in cultural variations in developmental trajectories. Over the years, he has integrated multi-disciplinary methods into his work through extensive collaborations with developmental psychologists, anthropologists, molecular geneticists, and cognitive neuroscientists. His current work focuses on the intricate relations among genes, brain, and behavior through both molecular and evolutionary genetic methods and brain-imaging techniques (fMRI and ERP).

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News