U.S. police shootings echo through criminology classrooms

November 2016

Teresa Dalton, Associate Professor of Teaching of Criminology, Law and Society, is quoted in Reuters, giving insight as to why many U.S. colleges and universities are expanding the criminology courses that are currently being offered to students, in light of the recent high-profile police-related deaths that have occurred.

From Reuters:

The University of California, Irvine is considering a course centered around the perspective of people who are arrested, rather than from the perspective of law enforcement, Dalton said. It would cover subjects such as obtaining bail and what it is like to be in jail.

"The purpose is to give cops perhaps a little more empathy in their discretionary decisions: You could arrest this person, or you could not arrest this person, but what will it mean?" she said.

Read Article

Remembering childhood trauma that never happened

​November 2016

Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law and Society, is featured in New York magazine for her contributions towards understanding the nature of false memories, and how prevalent it is within our society and law enforcement.

From New York:

No matter how bizarre or alien the scenario seems, it’s never so strange that you cannot convince someone it actually happened. “We are almost at the point of having a recipe for how to do this,” Loftus says. “A first step involves trying to make people feel something is plausible. In questionable therapy, people are told that many, many people have repressed memories and that you need to uncover them to feel better. That is a plausibility-enhancing message.”

The war on drugs is coming back

November 2016

Mona Lynch, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, is interviewed in Slate magazine, for her expertise and insight as to what former Alabama federal prosecutor Jeff Sessions could do as U.S. Attorney General, if confirmed by the Senate. Furthermore, she elaborates as to his potential impact towards the drug war and reforming the federal justice system.

Loftus to be named AAAS fellow

November 2016

Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law and Society, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society. She is recognized for her significant contributions to social psychology, particularly human memory and its application to legal proceedings, and for dedicated service to AAAS on its board of directors. She joins eight University of California, Irvine researchers for this honor.

Loftus awarded 2016 John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science

 


November 2016

Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of psychology & social behavior and criminology, law & society at the University of California, Irvine, was awarded the international John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science today in London. Best known for her groundbreaking work on the “misinformation effect” – in which the memories of eyewitnesses are altered by exposure to incorrect information about events – she was also honored for her pioneering research on the creation and nature of false memories.

“I could hardly contain my excitement when I first learned that I would receive the prize, especially since it recognizes the work of people who promote sound, credible science that bears on a matter of public interest and who have faced tough challenges in the process,” Loftus said.

Now in its fifth year, the John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science is a joint initiative of the international scientific journal Nature, of which Maddox was editor for 22 years; the Kohn Foundation, whose founder, Sir Ralph Kohn, was a personal friend of Maddox’s; and the charity Sense about Science, where Maddox served as a trustee until his death in 2009.

“Standing up for psychological science in general and research on memory in particular has brought a good deal of antagonism my way,” Loftus said. “Receiving this award helps to erase the pain of insults, death threats and lawsuits. And I love the idea that my CV will forever contain the name of the late Sir John Maddox, respected by all for his tireless defense of science.”

 

Loftus awarded 2016 John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science

November 2016

Elizabeth Loftus is recognized for pioneering work on malleability of human memory

Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine, was awarded the international John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science today in London. Best known for her groundbreaking work on the “misinformation effect” – in which the memories of eyewitnesses are altered by exposure to incorrect information about events – she was also honored for her pioneering research on the creation and nature of false memories.

“I could hardly contain my excitement when I first learned that I would receive the prize, especially since it recognizes the work of people who promote sound, credible science that bears on a matter of public interest and who have faced tough challenges in the process,” Loftus said.

2016's States with the Biggest Bullying Problems

November 2016

Nancy Guerra, Dean of School of Social Ecology and Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, is featured in Wallet Hub, as she, along with other experts, give insight over what factors make a child at risk of being bullied, what measures that can be taken to prevent bullying, and how state and local governments can take part in bullying prevention.

Photo Credit: Wallet Hub

6 Ways to Grieve for the Election

November 2016

Roxane Cohen Silver, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, is quoted in New York magazine for her expertise. Based off of her research, she gives advice to readers on overcoming the angst and disappointment that has arisen from the outcomes of this year's elections.

From New York

University of California, Irvine, psychologist Roxane Cohen Silver says that, shockingly enough, from her research in how people recover from the shock of terrorist attacks, keeping CNN all day is not a good call. “A steady diet of media, repetition of the same sort of distressing stories doesn’t have psychological benefits,” she says. Go for a mind-clearing run, do yoga, watch a beloved show, party. Get away from it, at least for a while.

Read Article

Trump Supporters, Come to Therapy with Me?

November 2016

Jessica Borelli, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, wrote an op-ed piece for The Huffington Post, urging readers to facilitate therapy-like conversations with others in regards to the divided opinions of this year's elections. By doing so, readers will have a more compassionate and empathetic response to others and be more likely to understand different perspectives towards the outcomes of this election.

Photo Credit: The Huffington Post

Read Article

 

Pages